self catering mull self catering on the isle ofmull argyll scotland
Home Page | Self Catering | Location | Contact | Things to do self catering mull


self catering mull

self catering mull
self catering mull holiday sightseeing

You may find this information helpful when researching the area

About the AJSR... This organization is a privately-held registry, guided by devoted Jacob breeders who value their sheep and the preservation of the breed over bureaucracy and politics. All animals registered by the AJSR are the result of a planned program on the part of the owners/breeders of the individual animals. The herdbook of the AJSR will remain permanently open to any individual sheep which has adequately demonstrated its ability to reproduce in kind, in accordance with the breed-testing program. The AJSR does not offer "memberships" nor does it charge dues.

About the Jacob Sheep... The Jacob is an old British breed. It is documented that such sheep existed in England about 400 years ago, but the exact details of origin are lost in time. There are many myths and fanciful tales surrounding the origins of the breed, including those linking it with the Middle east or with the Spanish Armada. It is probable the 4-horned characteristic derives from Viking animal ancestry. Although there is no present-day evidence of direct ancestry to Biblical times nor to the Middle East, the name of this spotted sheep breed apparently is taken from the Biblical story about Jacob. Jacob sheep have multi-colored fleeces and are always horned. It is preferred that the horns be an even number, and well-balanced; but many other horn numbers and patterns are possible and acceptable. A primitive breed, Jacobs are easy lambers and excellent mothers.

Registration Information It is important to bear in mind that the "perfect sheep" does not actually exist, and that a registry has the task of registering all acceptable candidates based on their breed purity, NOT on their relative closeness to any ideal of perfection! Registration Instructions & Information All sheep must pass inspection prior to registration. This requires that a clear, good-resolution portrait-type photos of the individual be submitted along with the application form. In addition, candidate sheep will fall into one of the following categories and the requirements described below must be completed to qualify the animals for registration. All sheep submitted for registration must be permanently identified by tattoo or eartag of the breeder's choice. This identification number will stay with the sheep for its entire life, and may not be altered. Registration certificates will reflect this number, as well as any name/identification assigned to the individual animal. It is recommended that a two-part name, consisting of the flock name and an individual name, be assigned to every sheep submitted for registration. ALL sheep registrations will carry the name of the flock of origin; NOT the flock name of a subsequent buyer. The WORST thing one can do is sell (or give away) coarse, hairy fleeces with a lot of kemp, dirt, and/or second cuts to any handspinners. You'll ruin your market that way faster than you can blink! It is recommended that a two-part name, consisting of the flock name and an individual name, be assigned to every sheep submitted for registration.

Acceptance of any application for registration is based on these stated criteria. Application fees for animals that may be rejected for whatever reason may not be refunded, at the registry's option. Applicants agree to hold the registry harmless for any decisions it deems appropriate. These regulations may be amended at any time, at the sole discretion of the registry and/or its administrators. The WORST thing one can do is sell (or give away) coarse, hairy fleeces with a lot of kemp, dirt, and/or second cuts to any handspinners. You'll ruin your market that way faster than you can blink! Corn silage is a high energy, low protein fermented feed suitable for sheep feeding. However, some guidelines should be followed when incorporating corn silage in ewe and lamb diets. Silage is an essential feed for livestock-based agriculture. Silage is the feedstuffs resulting from the preservation of green forage crops by acidification. Acidification is the result of the fermentaion of the forage in the absence of oxygen. When properly harvested and stored, silage poses little or no pollution threat, but improper handling can lead to a significant flow of silage juices (or leachate) from the silo.